Vision Mining, Inc. v. Gardner, 2010-SC-000311-WC (Ky. 2011):  KRS 342.316 subjects coal workers’ pneumoconiosis claimants to a more stringent statutory treatment than all other pneumoconiosis claimants and thus violates the equal protection guarantees of the Federal and Kentucky Constitutions.

In 2002, the Kentucky Legislature enacted amendments to KRS Chapter 342, which required coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) claimants to undergo additional administrative procedures before being able to proceed with their claims.  The procedures consisted of consensus readings by a panel of readers, resulting in many claims being denied without further adjudication.  The law was challenged in Vision Mining v. Gardner and approximately 200 claims were placed in abeyance pending the outcome of the Vision Mining appeal.

The Supreme Court determined that there is no real distinction between the various forms of pneumoconiosis, but Chapter 342 of the Kentucky Revised Statutes treats coal workers differently than those from other occupations with respect to workers’ compensation. Specifically, the Court noted, these varying claimants endure different procedures and presumptions and enjoy distinct benefits.

For CWP claimants, KRS 342.316(3) requires a different procedure to establish its existence than it requires for all other types of pneumoconiosis.  The CWP procedure consists of a two-step consensus procedure which can only be rebutted by a clear and convincing evidence standard, a standard of proof greater than a preponderance of the evidence but less than reasonable doubt, causing the Court to conclude that “defeating a consensus panel assessment was virtually impossible.”

In contrast, KRS 342.315(2) which provides for appointment of a university evaluator to address all other occupational pneumoconiosis and diseases requires an opposing party merely establish “a reasonable basis” for rebutting a university evaluator’s clinical findings and opinions, a standard the Court noted as much lower than “clear and convincing.”

Thus, the Court observed, when adjudicating CWP claims, a fact-finder is restricted in weighing conflicting evidence, but when adjudicating all other occupational pneumoconiosis claims, the fact-finder encounters no such restrictions.

As such, the Court held that the language of KRS 342.316, along with the relevant subsections of KRS 342.315 and KRS 342.794, subjects coal workers’ pneumoconiosis claimants to a more stringent statutory treatment than all other pneumoconiosis claimants and therefore violates  the equal protection guarantees of the Federal and Kentucky Constitutions.

COMMENT:  This is  the most important workers’ compensation decision to come out of the Kentucky Supreme Court in 2011, and perhaps the most important workers’ compensation decision in years.  With Vision Mining, Kentucky’s highest court finally grappled with a long-time controversial statute, and this decision will no doubt open a flood gate of CWP claims being reconsidered and more claims being filed once the Kentucky legislature has acted.

Click here to read the complete decision.

Click here to read Lexington Herald-Leader Editorial

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